Emma Yasinski

I am a freelance science and medical journalist, fascinated by how the scientific process leads to incredible discoveries, but also can lead to publication bias leaning toward positive findings and minimizing negatives. With a bachelor’s degree in neuroscience from Lafayette College and a Master’s in Science and Medical Journalism from Boston University, I’ve written about clinical trial transparency, organ donation, and basic molecular biology for publications like The Scientist, The Atlantic, Undark.org, Kaiser Health News, and more. At MedShadow, I research and write about the sometimes unexpected ways that medicines can affect us, and what we can do if and when it does.

“Did you know you will experience symptoms of heartburn if you make too much acid, but also if you are deficient? Weird but true. Healthy amounts of stomach acid keep the tiny trap door shut between your stomach and esophagus. This sphincter is pH sensitive and in a healthy person, it stays shut because of the natural production of acid in the stomach. When you reduce stomach acid, you then have insufficient amounts, and your stomach pH increases and this causes the trap door to swing open, causing heartburn. That’s why some people who take a digestive acid supplement (like…

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Freshly cut grass, a friendly puppy or a dusty rug is all it takes to set off an asthma attack for Olga Cerini. “My asthma is allergy-based,”  says Cerini, who lives in New York City. But she is able to keep her asthma under control, she says, because—in addition to her medications and years of allergy shots—she is careful to avoid these triggers. For example, “In my home, we have no rugs because rugs are a horrible source of dust,” she says.  “We clean frequently with a damp cloth, use either synthetic or cotton bedding, and vacuum the furniture and curtains…

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