Author: Kimberly Bliss

Complex PTSD “What My Bones Know” opens with a diagnosis, the author’s. Stephanie Foo, previously a producer at NPR’s “This American Life,” and by her own admission a successful journalist in a happy relationship, learns she has complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in an online therapy session in 2018 with her therapist of eight years, Samantha. “Not just PTSD. Complex PTSD. The difference between regular PTSD and complex PTSD is that a traditional PTSD is often associated with a moment of trauma. Sufferers of complex PTSD have undergone continual abuse – trauma that has occurred over a long period…

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There will never be enough “ink” to write the story of the Sackler family and Purdue Pharma, their role in the opioid epidemic in the U.S., and stories of the lives that overprescribing of OxyContin destroyed. As the U.S. Supreme Court finalizes its decision on a Sackler family legal shield in exchange for a large settlement that is worth billions, and supports both state addiction programs and funds for victim’s families, we are once again, collectively as a nation, reflecting on what went wrong, and how to make it better.  The story, in any form, deserves to be told, whether…

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Chris van Tulleken did an experiment a la Supersize Me whereby he, the researcher, was a guinea pig in the extreme sport version of eating poorly. “The idea was simple: I would quit UPF for a month, next month I would eat a diet where 80 percent of my calories came from UPF – the same diet that around one in five people in the UK and the USA eat.” “Ultra-Processed People: The Science Behind Food That Isn’t Food,” by Chris van Tulleken, is a rousing and eye-popping look at the history, research, and real-life impacts of eating food ingredients…

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Lori Gottlieb’s bestselling memoir, “Maybe You Should Talk To Someone” is a rollicking read that happily blurs the lines between patient and therapist. Gottlieb is a psychotherapist with a successful practice in Los Angeles, and she is no stranger to writing having helmed the “Dear Therapist” column every week for The Atlantic. Then one day, her fiancée dumps her. Gottlieb, it turns out, is about to take the very advice she has doled out thousands of times: “Maybe you should talk to someone.”  Her memoir is that journey from therapist to patient, and readers will delight in the pulling back…

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“There is no way to put a shine on my circumstance, as I have so many times in the past, publicly and privately. Positivism is a state of mind one achieves, and I am presently an underachiever.”                                                                                                   –  Michael J. Fox ,, No Time Like the Future ” In 1991, Michael…

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“Insomnia is a 24-hour disorder. And the daytime component of insomnia is more than half the puzzle. To overcome insomnia, almost all the changes you will need to make will happen when you’re awake.” – Jade Wu, PH.D. How To Beat Insomnia Dr. Jade Wu not only knows what’s keeping you awake, she is a doctor with over a decade’s-worth of experience in helping patients achieve an ever elusive goal: sleep. Hello Sleep is both a how-to book for insomniacs looking to end their misery and a layperson’s guide to the scientific studies that support rethinking our relationship with sleep.…

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“The loneliness, sadness, and melancholic hum of my life all validated by 10,000 antidepressants. I don’t think about them when they get delivered to my door or when they slide down my throat. No doctor ever questions their use. No pharmacist refuses a refill.” In Reno, Nevada in 2001, Brooke Siem emerged from a child psychiatrist’s office with a prescription for antidepressants at age 15. Her father had just died, and her struggle with depression began down a medicated path.  She was among the first wave of adolescents given these drugs. Years later, nearing her 30th birthday and plagued with…

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“It took years before I realized that the chronic illness was not just my own; the silence around suffering was our society’s pathology.” – Meghan O’Rourke Meghan O’Rourke tackles her chronic illness with the imagination of what could be possible in healthcare and medicine, and with her conversational breakdown of research and science in her New York Times’ bestselling The Invisible Kingdom. Readers will be taken with her personal story as their guide for how to fight chronic illness and incorporate pain management. While those with chronic disease will find power and resources in these pages, it is a story…

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MedShadow has reached more people than ever this year — more than 3 times as many in fact — with articles and news on the side effects and long-term effects of prescription medication. Looking at the pros and cons, we continuously break down the reality behind the labels. In 2015, we tackled controversial topics and explained complicated ones. One highlight: Our FDA Watch blogger Sarah Smedley took on the agency’s approval of a drug to improve women’s libido despite a list of problems and minimal upside. Here’s a look at our Top 10 of 2015! [metaslider id=9907] MedShadow Top 10…

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Before we say goodbye to 2014, we’d like to ring in the new year with 5 important stories in case you missed them. These articles go to the heart of our mission to change the conversation about side effects. [metaslider id=5816] In the past year, we looked at long- and short-term side effects of many kinds of prescription drugs, and at ways to lessen those side effects, from finding alternative medications to making lifestyle changes. We published First Person accounts about finding the right pharmaceuticals for bipolar disorder and learning how important it is to get all the information you…

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