Alzheimer’s disease is a brain disorder characterized by a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. It’s not the same condition as dementia; in fact, it’s one form of dementia. While it’s more common in older adults, it’s not a normal part of aging. Approximately 5.2 million Americans had Alzheimer’s disease in 2014, with 200,000 of those under 65. Of the 5 million sufferers over age 65, 3.2 million are women, and 1.8 million are men. Women are also more likely to be caregivers of Alzheimer’s patients. The numbers of Alzheimer’s sufferers is projected to triple by 2050, as…

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Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a parasite. People with malaria often experience fever, chills and flu-like illness. Left untreated, those who contract malaria may develop severe complications and die. In 2010 an estimated 219 million cases of malaria occurred worldwide and 660,000 people died, most (91%) of the fatalities occurred in the African Region. (From the CDC) Resistance to antimalarial drugs is increasing which undermines global control efforts and puts people, particularly children, at higher risk of developing the disease. Malaria is rare in the United States with only 1,500 cases reported annually. Travelers to areas where malaria is or…

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All the antimalarial drugs are taken before, during and for a period of time after traveling to the area of exposure. Even when taking antimalarial drugs, a person should take the normal precautions for avoiding mosquito bites, including using insect repellent, wearing long sleeves and pants and applying a net over the bed. Your doctor should determine which drug is most appropriate for you after consulting with the latest information from the Centers for Disease Control which offers country-specific tables. Atovaquone – Proguanil (Malarone) Generally well tolerated with few side effects. Side effects reported are: diarrhea, fever, skin rash, mouth…

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Sleep On average, most adults require 7 or 8 hours of sleep to function well. Adolescents need an average of about 9-1/2 hours. Exposure to light affects our circadian biologic clock. Light travels from the optic nerve to the brain, triggering the complex process of awakening. This includes suppressing the release of hormones such as melatonin that promote sleepiness. Women are more likely to report insomnia because menopause, pregnancy and menstruation tend to disrupt sleep. Older people, whose circadian clocks become less sensitive with age and who may also endure pain from arthritis and other conditions, are more likely to…

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By Liz Neporent Treatment Category Common Treatments Potential Side Effects Notes Over the counter Used mainly as an acute treadment but can be used as preventatives under direction of a physician. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) NSAIDs. (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) Naproxen sodium (Aleve, Anaprox), and ketoprofen (Actron, Orudis.) If taken too often can cause ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding and medication-overuse headaches. If you rely on these more than twice a week, see your doctor. If you experience gastrointestinal symptoms after taking, see your doctor. Caffeine Used as an acute treatment but can be used as a preventative. Coffee,…

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Two types of medications are used to treat asthma: quick-relief medications to stop symptoms, and long-term medications to prevent them. Quick-Relief Medications: There are 3 types of quick-relief medicines. Because they are all stimulants, any of the quick-reliefs can cause anxiety, tremors, restlessness, headache and a fast or irregular heartbeat. Uncontrollable shaking and heart problems should be immediately reported to your doctor. Emergency inhalers/Oral or inhaled steroids, such as prednisone, Asmonex, Alvesco, Flovent, Pulmicort, and Qvar. Anticholnergics, such as Spiriva, Oxivent, or Atrovent Short-acting beta-agonists, such as albuterol. Side effects of albuterol can include: nervousness, headache, nausea, vomiting, cough, throat…

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Following is a list of major cancer information organizations. National Cancer Institute Part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is one of the 11 agencies that compose the Department of Health and Human Services. It is the Federal Government’s principal agency for cancer research and traininig. National Comprehensive Cancer Network Alliance of 21 major cancer centers with expert panels that analyzes research and recommend treatments. Ovarian Cancer National Alliance An advocate to advance the interests of women with ovarian cancer. Offers information and suggestions for newly diagnosed patients and support groups. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force The USPSTF…

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More than 3 million Americans use acupuncture each year to treat a wide range of ailments. An estimated 30,000 acupuncturists, licensed therapists (L.Ac) and medical doctors who are credentialed to perform acupuncture, are now providing treatment in the US. Acupuncture is an ancient form of Chinese medicine. It’s based on the premise that a subtle life energy—or “qi”—circulates through the 14 major energy channels of the body, known as meridians. The channels are like “roadways” that transport qi to every part of the body, including its internal organs and tissues. When a person’s qi becomes blocked or imbalanced—through poor nutrition,…

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