Editor’s Note 11/23/2021: Researchers recently published data showing that 41% of patients on the therapeutic dose of Adhuhelm in clinical trials experienced brain bleeds. Fewer than a third of those patients experienced symptoms. The New York Times reported one death under investigation. Some researchers worry that clinical trial participants were much healthier and therefore not representative of patients now likely to be prescribed the drug.  The newly approved drug Aduhelm (aducanumab) won’t cure or reverse the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. It might slow the disease’s progression, but there’s no proof that it will do that either. Even worse is that…

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has now approved the diabetes drug Wegovy (semaglutide), previously okayed for diabetes, for weight loss. I wonder why? I was the consumer representative on the FDA advisory panel that voted to approve Wegovy (semaglutide) for diabetes. I voted for it reluctantly and only because the drug helped slightly improve life for those with diabetes.  A small weight loss is one benefit of Wegovy. Patients given Wegovy in clinical trials lost between five and 10 pounds. That’s helpful for a person with type-2 diabetes, but for the average person, it’s minor. The average weight of…

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Happy Independence Day weekend! This is the most important holiday to MedShadow because we celebrate our ongoing independence from pharmaceutical influence.  We are one of the few, free, nonprofit sites that refuses pharma money because we are committed to giving you the unbiased, honest facts of health that you need to keep yourself and your family safer from medical harm.  Misleading information, even lies, from drug companies is nothing new and a reality across our nation’s history. In the winter of 1905, Mark Twain himself sent the world’s most eloquent angry letter to a drug company selling bogus patent medicine…

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Like you, I’ve heard a lot about the Frontline Doctors organization that materialized, seemingly, out of nowhere to stand on the Supreme Court steps in July and declare that much of the COVID-19 information that the CDC (Centers for Disease Prevention and Treatment), the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) and individual state authorities were giving out was a lie. While garnering headlines, the Frontline Doctors produced its breakout star, emergency room physician and attorney Simone Gold, MD. Because a good friend asked my opinion of Gold’s recent video, I spent an hour watching her YouTube lecture. Although the video has…

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Are you worried about ACE inhibitors and coronavirus? You may be hearing that one of the entry methods for the coronavirus in humans is by attaching to the ACE-2 enzyme. This has raised alarms among those with heart disease who use ACE inhibitors (with names ending in -pril, such as lisinopril), and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs, with names ending in -sartan, such as valsartan). Those having severe cases of COVID-19 are often those with hypertension and either type 1 or Type II diabetes and those patients are often taking ACE-1 inhibitors and ARBs. Both diabetes and these drugs increase…

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The ‘Sugar Daddy’ episode is in ‘collaboration’ with Novo-Nordisk – maker of diabetes drugs – and minimizes the ways diet and exercise can help diabetics. Do you like the TV show black-ish? I do. It’s funny, and the acting is outstanding. But even better, every week the show uses its immense platform to educate the public on race issues. I admire the show and look forward to watching it. Imagine my outrage when I watched the episode about type 2 diabetes entitled “Sugar Daddy” and realized the show had sold out to a pharmaceutical company. Oops, sorry, the TV network…

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Can we use a different endocrine disruptor to predict BPA effects, including cardiovascular problems? Maybe so. Many scientists are working to discover the effect of endocrine disruptors such as BPA (bisphenol A) to predict what that effect might be on people. Some studies have raised concern that exposure to endocrine disruptors may be positively linked with cardiovascular disease. Endocrine disruptors essentially confuse the mechanism in human bodies that tells genes when to turn on (e.g., start puberty) and when to turn off (e.g., stop growing hair). Because BPA is ubiquitous in our environment, it is nearly impossible to isolate a…

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Is your cholesterol high? Has your doctor suggested you might be at risk for heart disease? If so, you have some decisions to make. You need to know that you can likely improve your health and lower your cholesterol by simple lifestyle changes like exercise and changing your diet. You also will likely have the option of taking a statin. The fact that people have choices in their health care is very important and something we explore at MedShadow, an online nonprofit I founded to inform the public about the side effects, risks and benefits of medicine, both prescription and…

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One of the most fascinating aspects of learning about side effects of drugs has been to discover that many side effects are predictable based on how the a drug works in the body — what is called "method of action." Opioids, for example, work by slowing pain receptors and increasing dopamine, a chemical that controls the brain’s reward and pleasure center, which is an effective way of inhibiting the body’s ability to feel pain and makes you feel great. Erin Attermeier This colorful and informative video explains how opioids work (there’s no sound). However, opioids not only go to the brain but also move throughout…

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