Cardiovascular Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women. In order to live, our hearts need to pump blood and oxygen to all of our organs. When our hearts or our vasculature weaken, that process is in danger.

Lifestyle factors like diet and exercise can have a big impact on your heart health, though aging, genetics and drug side effects can still hurt your cardiovascular system. Drugs to lower cholesterol and blood pressure are some of the most commonly prescribed treatments for adults. MedShadow helps you understand the benefits and side effects of these drugs, and provides options that may help you lower your dose and limit side effects.

Essential Information

The Top Heart Meds: Risks Vs. Benefits

Prescription heart medications are so common — millions of Americans currently take at least one to treat everything from high blood pressure and high cholesterol to heart failure and...

Statins: Need To Know

Doctors prescribe statins to lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease. Here are pros and cons to consider when taking them. Common Names Lipitor (atorvastatin), Crestor (rosuvastatin), Zocor...

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