Geri Anne Fennessey

Geri Anne Fennessey is a New York City-based freelance writer and communications consultant.

Sufferers of celiac disease know all too well the common symptoms of severe nausea, diarrhea, gas, bloating and fatigue that accompany the illness. They also know that adopting — and sticking to — a gluten-free diet will bring long-term relief. But sometimes a gluten-free diet fails to get celiac symptoms under control — known as refractory celiac disease. There is no proven treatment for refractory celiac, but doctors may prescribe drugs off label, such as corticosteroids (prednisone, budesonide) or the immune-suppressing drugs infliximab (Remicade) or azathioprine (Imuran, Azasan), to combat the symptoms. The side effects of both types of drugs…

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Lung cancer is one of the toughest cancers to treat, affecting nearly 229,000 people and killing nearly 136,000 in 2020. With tough treatment come some truly debilitating side effects, such as nerve damage, loss of appetite, severe nausea and vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, hair loss and mouth sores.

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I started taking the pill when I was in college, not as a method of birth control, but because it was the only thing that worked to quell the debilitating symptoms –- agonizing cramps, headaches, and severe nausea –- that accompanied my monthly period. About 10 years ago, I briefly went off the pill, mostly because it seemed like a good idea to give my body a break, and because of some vague concerns about breast cancer. The returning menstrual pains were more than merely unpleasant. A month after stopping the pill, I suffered an episode of such horrible cramps…

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Certain risk factors for breast cancer, such as age and family history, are beyond our control. But changing our diet — to eliminate certain foods and add others — can make a big difference. A healthy diet can help keep weight down, build a body’s immunity and decrease the risk of breast cancer.

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A guide to different prescribed osteoarthritis drugs according to the patient’s level of pain Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of bones wears down over time, leading to irritation, pain, swelling and loss of motion. OA often gradually worsens over time, and there is no cure for it. Pain medications — ranging from topical creams to injections — can offer symptomatic relief but cause side effects; so delaying or minimizing drug use is of benefit to OA sufferers. (See Food as Medicine: Osteoarthritis for suggestions on how weight loss, diet…

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What do salmon, broccoli, grapes and low-fat milk all have in common? Each of these foods have special medicinal properties that can help sufferers of osteoarthritis (OA) ease joint pain and inflammation without harmful side effects. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is the most common form of arthritis in the U.S., affecting more than 27 million people. It occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of bones wears down over time, leading to irritation, pain (as bone rubs on bone), swelling and loss of motion. Although OA can damage any joint in the body, the disorder most commonly affects…

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