COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effect Tracker

covid-19 vaccine side effect tracker

Most Recent Updates:

Click the dates to jump to more details.

  • June 9: A study in Nature Medicine suggests that there may be a very slightly elevated risk of blood disorders after receipt of the AstraZeneca vaccine, but not Pfizer’s.
  • May 26: A 37-year old woman in Belgium died from a blood clot thought to be related to the Johnson and Johnson vaccine she received.
  • May 23: The CDC is investigating reports of myocarditis in a small number of vaccinated teens. It’s not yet clear if these events were related to the vaccine.
  • May 20: An analysis published in JAMA suggests that hearing loss is NOT a side effect of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.
  • May 13: The CDC has identified more cases of the rare clotting disorder associated with the J&J vaccine. The total is 28 cases.
  • May 10: Pfizer’s vaccine received Emergency Use Authorization for 12 to 15-year-olds. The company reported that common adverse effects like chills and fever were more frequent in this age group than adults.
  • May 5: Researchers published a detailed analysis of skin reactions after Moderna and Pfizer vaccinations, including swelling and rashes. (click here for more details on Pfizer)

 

To help you sort through the news on the COVID-19 vaccine’s progress, MedShadow has created the MedShadow Vaccine Tracker, the only tracker focused on the side effects and adverse events associated with proposed COVID-19 vaccinations.

Rather than injecting patients with a weakened virus or proteins from the pathogen that our immune systems can recognize, which is what’s typically done when we get a flu vaccine, the new vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer — the two that made it to the market first in the U.S. — contain mRNA (messenger RNA), which is a genetic template that instructs our cells to build the viral proteins that our immune systems can then recognize. Its main perk is that allowing our bodies to produce the proteins (rather than growing them in a lab like traditional vaccines) slashes production time. For nearly 20 years, researchers have been interested in using mRNA in vaccines; and some were even tested in early clinical trials for rabies, influenza and Zika. However, the vaccines for COVID-19 will be the first mRNA vaccines ever authorized by the FDA.

Some risks and minor side effects, such as a sore arm where the vaccine is injected or a light skin rash, are clearly worth the benefit of being protected against a disease. Where to draw the line at what is or is not acceptable is a personal decision. That’s where the MedShadow Vaccine Tracker can help. 

On the tracker, we will be publishing up-to-date Phase 3 results information about the risks of each vaccination. Phase 3 tests the vaccine for safety and efficacy in large groups of people (tens of thousands) and is the last stage before the FDA considers approval for use in the population at large. We continue following verified reports as the vaccines are offered to the general public. It is important to note that reports of events occurring after vaccination are not inherently linked to it. As countries begin to vaccinate hundreds of millions of people, some would inevitably be diagnosed with illnesses or pass away each day with or without the injections.

Jump to:

ModernaPfizerCanSinBio (China) | Gameleya (Russia) | Johnson & Johnson

AstrazenecaNovavax (UK)Sinopharm (China)Sinovac (China)Murdoch (England)|Bharat Biotech

 


Moderna

Moderna started Phase III clinical trials for its vaccine candidate in July. In earlier trials, nearly half of patients experienced common adverse effects like injection site pain, rash, headaches, muscle soreness, nausea and fevers after the second injection. These effects generally subsided within two days. CNBC spoke to a few individuals, some participating in Moderna’s trial and some in Pfizer’s trial who said much the same thing: the side effects were intense and included a high fever, body aches, bad headaches and exhaustion, but were worth it for protection from Covid-19.

In the FDA report published in December, the most common side effects were pain at injection site (91.6% of patients), fatigue (68.5%), headache (63.0%), muscle pain (59.6%), joint pain (44.8%), and chills (43.4%). Three patients experienced Bell’s Palsy, a sudden, and usually temporary, weakening or paralysis of the facial muscles.

The CDC reports that 11% of patients experienced swollen lymph nodes after the first shot. That raised to 16% after the second shot.

A few patients with facial fillers experienced swelling after receiving the vaccine. They were treated with antihistamines and steroids.

January 18: In California, officials halted the use of one particular batch of Moderna vaccines (lot 41L20A) after a small cluster (fewer than 10) of patients at one particular site experienced allergic reactions that required medical attention.

February 1: A study posted on Feb 1 showed that patients who received the vaccine after having been previously infected with COVID-19 showed greater immune response to the first shot and more intense side effects that are associated with strong immune responses like fever and muscle aches. The study included patients who received either the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine. Some scientists believe these patients may only need a single shot to provide sufficient immunity, but more research is needed.

February 12: Out of the first 7.5 million doses administered from Dec 14- Jan 18, 19 cases of anaphylaxis were reported to VAERS after the Moderna vaccine. No patients have died from anaphylaxis. Patients are now being monitored for 15-30 minutes after receiving the vaccine to watch for signs of anaphylaxis. The CDC suggests that anyone who has an immediate allergic reaction to a single dose of an mRNA vaccine (Moderna or Pfizer) should not get the second dose. If your reaction was not immediate, you may be referred to an allergy specialist. The vaccines do not contain polysorbate, but do have a related ingredient, polyethylene glycol (PEG). If you have an allergy to either of these chemicals, you should not get the vaccines. 

Many patients are reporting injection site reactions that show up shortly after the injection or up to a week later. These reactions — which are characterized by swelling, redness, itching, rashes, heat and pain — are expected to last a day to a week. Physicians emphasize that while these effects can be scary, they are not dangerous and should not prevent someone from getting the second shot. So far, doctors do not report seeing these reactions after the second shot, however so few have been given so far that scientists are not sure how common it will be on round two.

March 3: Allergy researchers at Mass General Hospital created a registry for healthcare professionals to report  immediate and delayed reactions to COVID-19 vaccinations. On March 3, the researchers published a letter in the New England Journal of Medicine describing a series of 12 delayed injection site reactions including swelling and rashes. The researchers wrote that one patient received antibiotics although they were not necessary. Several others were treated with steroids or anti inflammatories. The letter included some photos and said that the reactions cleared up within a median of six days. Patients were encouraged to receive their second dose. Half of them did not experience the reaction the second time. A quarter did, but to a lesser degree.

March 8: Researchers from Mass General Brigham published a Research Letter in JAMA analyzing allergic reactions in employees who received their shots there. Out of 52,805 participants, 2.1% experienced some kind of allergic reaction, including hives, itching, rash, swelling or respiratory symptoms within the first three days after vaccination. Allergies were slightly more common with the Moderna vaccine than the Pfizer vaccine (2.2% compared to 1.95%). Sixteen experienced anaphylaxis.

Moderna has announced that it will begin testing its vaccine in children and adolescents, who they believe may have stronger immune responses, leading to more intense side effects.

April 20: Researchers have received over 25,000 responses to an online survey regarding menstrual changes after receiving any COVID-19 vaccine. The survey is ongoing as researchers hope to gain a better understanding of future directions of research. An op-ed in the New York Times explains how the vaccines could potentially interact with menstrual cycles, and why we really don’t know yet.

April 22: The CDC published an analysis of data from the first few months of voluntary V-safe surveys that suggested that the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are safe for pregnant women. Pregnant patients self-reported slightly fewer side effects like fever, headache and chills than the general population, but more said they experienced nausea and injection site pain. Rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes such as pre-term birth were similar to rates seen before the pandemic. While promising, officials noted that more studies will be required.

April 26: MedShadow asked doctors about some of the unusual symptoms we’re hearing about in the comments: heart palpitations and visual disturbances. They hadn’t had patients who reported long-term symptoms, but said that if the symptoms occurred very quickly after vaccination, they could be related to allergic reactions or presyncope.

April 27: Clinical trials of Moderna and Pfizer vaccines showed 7 cases of Bell’s Palsy. An analysis published today in JAMA suggested the experience was no more frequent after these vaccines than other vaccines. It is unclear whether vaccines raise the risk of facial paralysis at all, but the authors write, “if an association between facial paralysis and mRNA COVID-19 vaccines exists, the risk is likely very low, as with other viral vaccines.”

May 5: Researchers published a detailed analysis of skin reactions after Moderna and Pfizer vaccinations, including swelling and rashes. Most patients with first dose reactions did not have reactions after their second dose. Larger reactions on the arm spreading outward from the injection site were the most common reactions among those who received the Moderna vaccine, followed by smaller localized reactions and hives. Five patients (1.9%) experienced a zoster (shingles) flare after the first dose but none after the second dose. About 1% of patients experienced a flare of an existing skin condition after each dose.

May 20: An analysis published in JAMA suggests that hearing loss is NOT a side effect of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.


Pfizer

Pfizer began Phase III clinical trial for its vaccine candidate in July. In earlier trials, some patients experienced common adverse effects like injection site pain, rash, headaches, muscle soreness, nausea and fevers. These effects generally subsided within two days. CNBC spoke to a few individuals, some participating in Pfizer’s trial and others in Moderna’s trial who said much the same thing: the side effects were intense and included a high fever body aches, bad headaches and exhaustion in addition to the more common side effects, but were worth it for protection from Covid-19.

Some patients described the side effects as being similar to a bad hangover. A nurse who participated in the clinical trial reported feeling minimal effects after the first dose, but a fever that reached more than 104 degrees Fahrenheit after the second injection, along with chills, headache, and intense injection site pain. According to researchers, her experience of having all symptoms together was rare, though many patients had one or two of these side effects. “Clinicians will need to be prepared to discuss with patients why they should trust the vaccine and that its adverse effects could look a lot like COVID-19,” the nurse wrote on Dec 7.

The FDA report published in December said the most common reactions were injection site reactions (84.1%), fatigue (62.9%), headache (55.1%), muscle pain (38.3%), chills (31.9%), joint pain (23.6%), fever (14.2%). Swollen lymph nodes occurred in 0.3% of patients. The FDA reported that four patients who received the vaccine experienced Bell’s Palsy.

January 12: A doctor in Florida died 16 days after receiving the vaccine from a rare blood disorder, acute immune thrombocytopenia. Both Pfizer and the CDC are investigating, though the company has released a statement that so far, they haven’t seen any signs in the clinical trials or data collected from early vaccinations that the death could be related to the vaccine. The blood disorder immune thrombocytopenia, has also been seen as a rare complication of COVID-19 itself, in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients.

January 19: Twenty-three elderly patients in Norway died after receiving Pfizer’s vaccine. Officials are investigating whether or not the deaths are vaccine-related. Anthony Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, suggests that while the deaths may be coincidental given the fragile population, it’s possible that side effects of the vaccines, like fevers, may have strained the frail patients’ bodies and contributed to their deaths. Norway has vaccinated about 45,000 people so far, most of whom live in nursing homes.

February 1: A study posted on Feb 1 showed that patients who received the vaccine after having been previously infected with COVID-19 showed greater immune response to the first shot and more intense side effects that are associated with strong immune responses like fever and muscle aches. The study included patients who received either the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine. Some scientists believe these patients may only need a single shot to provide sufficient immunity, but more research is needed.

February 12: Out of the first 9.9 million doses administered from Dec 14- Jan 18, 47 cases of anaphylaxis were reported to VAERS after the Pfizer vaccine. Patients are now being monitored for 15-30 minutes after receiving the vaccine to watch for signs of anaphylaxis. The CDC suggests that anyone who has an immediate allergic reaction to a single dose of an mRNA vaccine (Moderna or Pfizer) should not get the second dose. If your reaction was not immediate, you may be referred to an allergy specialist. The vaccines do not contain polysorbate, but do have a related ingredient, polyethylene glycol (PEG). If you have an allergy to either of these chemicals, you should not get the vaccines. 

March 8: Researchers from Mass General Brigham published a Research Letter in JAMA analyzing allergic reactions in employees who received their shots there. Out of 52,805 participants, 2.1% experienced some kind of allergic reaction, including hives, itching, rash, swelling or respiratory symptoms within the first three days after vaccination. Allergies were slightly more common with the Moderna vaccine than the Pfizer vaccine (2.2% compared to 1.95%). Sixteen experienced anaphylaxis.

March 30: Researchers publish a case study of a single patient in which they suspect the Pfizer vaccine may have caused a rheumatoid arthritis flare. The flare was treated, and the patient is in remission. The researchers and RA advocacy groups still advise patients to get the vaccine as the benefits outweigh the risks of a flare up.

April 20: Researchers have received over 25,000 responses to an online survey regarding menstrual changes after receiving any COVID-19 vaccine. The survey is ongoing as researchers hope to gain a better understanding of future directions of research. An op-ed in the New York Times explains how the vaccines could potentially interact with menstrual cycles, and why we really don’t know yet.

April 22: The CDC published an analysis of data from the first few months of voluntary V-safe surveys that suggested that the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are safe for pregnant women. Pregnant patients self-reported slightly fewer side effects like fever, headache and chills than the general population, but more said they experienced nausea and injection site pain. Rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes such as pre-term birth were similar to rates seen before the pandemic. While promising, officials noted that more studies will be required.

April 26: MedShadow asked doctors about some of the unusual symptoms we’re hearing about in the comments: heart palpitations and visual disturbances. They hadn’t had patients who reported long-term symptoms, but said that if the symptoms occurred very quickly after vaccination, they could be related to allergic reactions or presyncope.

April 27: Clinical trials of Moderna and Pfizer vaccines showed 7 cases of Bell’s Palsy. An analysis published today in JAMA suggested the experience was no more frequent after these vaccines than other vaccines. It is unclear whether vaccines raise the risk of facial paralysis at all, but the authors write, “if an association between facial paralysis and mRNA COVID-19 vaccines exists, the risk is likely very low, as with other viral vaccines.”

May 5: Researchers published a detailed analysis of skin reactions after Moderna and Pfizer vaccinations, including swelling and rashes. Nearly a quarter of patients had smaller local reactions after each of the two shots. Hives were the most common skin reaction (26% after the first shot, 18% after the second,) among patients who received the Pfizer vaccine. Several also experienced flares of existing skin conditions.

May 10: Pfizer’s vaccine received Emergency Use Authorization for 12 to 15-year-olds. The company reported that common adverse effects like chills and fever were more common in this age group than adults. Adverse reactions in adolescents 12 through 15 years of age included pain at the injection site (90.5%), fatigue (77.5%), headache (75.5%), chills (49.2%), muscle pain (42.2%), fever (24.3%), joint pain (20.2%), injection site swelling (9.2%), injection site redness (8.6%), lymphadenopathy (0.8%), and nausea (0.4%). These effects generally subsided within 1-2 days. While data on syncope (fainting) was not included, the announcement mentioned that fainting after vaccination is more common in teens than adults, and that safety measures should be in place to reduce this risk.

May 20: An analysis published in JAMA suggests that hearing loss is NOT a side effect of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

May 23: The CDC is investigating reports of myocarditis in a small number of vaccinated teens. Myocarditis, or inflammation of the heart, has multiple causes but a viral infection is the most common trigger. In 2019, one million people were diagnosed with myocarditis, most of them under 40 years old. It’s not yet clear if these events were related to the vaccine.

June 9: A study in Nature Medicine suggests that there may be a very slightly elevated risk of blood disorders after receipt of the AstraZeneca vaccine, but NOT Pfizer’s. The study was based on an analysis of medical records in Scotland. Researchers say the vaccine’s benefits still outweigh the risks and that their results should not alter policy. The rates are similar to those seen with other common vaccines.


CanSinBio (China) 

China granted the CanSinBio vaccine emergency approval prior to beginning a Phase III trial in August. In the Phase II trial, nearly three-quarters of patients reported at least one common mild adverse events including injection site pain, rash, headaches, muscle soreness, and fevers. Five people also reported vomiting.


Gamaleya Research Institute (Russia)

Gamaleya Research Institute launched Phase III trials in August. But before they got started, President Putin announced that the vaccine was approved early, however, the Phase III trials are expected to continue. In the earlier trials, almost all of the patients experienced low-grade fevers. A small number of patients reported heart palpitations. Otherwise, reported side effects were similar to other vaccines and included injection site pain, rash, headaches, and muscle soreness.

Feb 2: The group reported efficacy data along with some data on side effects in The Lancet. The most common adverse events were flu-like illness (15.2% of those vaccinated) and local reactions (5.4% of those vaccinated).

The report also states that there were six grade 3 adverse events which were not associated with the vaccination: acute sinusitis, an exacerbation of urolithiasis along with renal colic and deep vein thrombosis (both associated with pre-existing comorbidities) and extremity abscess (due to physical injury and subsequent infection of the wound surface of the soft tissues of the finger).


Johnson & Johnson

Johnson & Johnson started a Phase III trial for its vaccine candidate in September 2020, but paused it on October 12 due to an unexplained illness and remains on hold. The company announced it would restart the trial on October 26. Pauses are common during clinical trials to evaluate specific adverse events, but the company has not shared details about the illness experienced by one of the trial volunteers. In earlier trials, about 70% of patients experienced at least one mild adverse effect similar to those seen with other vaccines, including injection site pain, rash, headaches, muscle soreness, and fevers.

On Feb 24, Johnson & Johnson shared data from its Phase III trials. The data suggested that while the vaccine is slightly less protective overall (but more protective against the 501Y.V2 variant that emerged from South Africa,) than the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, it produced fewer side effects.

The report says the most common reactions were injection site reactions (50.2%), fatigue (38.2%), headache (38.9%), muscle pain (33.2%), nausea (14.2%) and fever (9.0%).  Reactions were more common in patients under 60 than over 60.

Injection site pain lasted a median of 2 days, but up to 7 days in 2.3% of patients.

April 8: A vaccination site in Colorado paused operations after 11 patients became nauseous and dizzy minutes after receiving the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Two patients were transmitted to the hospital, but the rest were deemed healthy enough to return home. Officials said that those vaccinated at the same site should not be concerned.


April 13: The U.S. is calling for a pause on distributing the Johnson & Johnson vaccine while the FDA and CDC investigate blood clots that occurred in six patients (out of 7 million who received the vaccine so far.) One patient died and another was hospitalized. All the clots occurred in women under 50 within two weeks of receiving the vaccine. The issue is similar to the one seen with the AstraZeneca vaccine in Europe.

April 20: Researchers have received over 25,000 responses to an online survey regarding menstrual changes after receiving any COVID-19 vaccine. The survey is ongoing as researchers hope to gain a better understanding of future directions of research.

April 23: The U.S. is resuming use of the vaccine after finding only 15 total cases of blood clots out of the 7 million vaccinated. Patients will be warned about the risk at vaccination sites. Symptoms including headache, leg pain and abdominal pain occur 6-14 days after vaccination. If you have these symptoms you should seek emergency medical treatment. It is treatable with certain blood thinners.

April 26: MedShadow asked doctors about some of the unusual symptoms we’re hearing about in the comments: heart palpitations and visual disturbances. They hadn’t had patients who reported long-term symptoms, but said that if the symptoms occurred very quickly after vaccination, they could be related to allergic reactions or presyncope.

April 27: Doctors suggested that patients with a history of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, should not get the Johnson and Johnson vaccine (mRNA vaccines like Pfizer and Moderna are ok). If you’re at an increased risk for other types of blood clots, (because you have obesity or you smoke, for example) you do not have an elevated risk of blood clots with the J&J vaccine.

April 30: Researchers published detailed data about 12 patients who experienced blood clots in JAMA.

May 13: The CDC has identified more cases of the rare clotting disorder associated with the J&J vaccine. The total is 28 cases. Three patients have died and four are still hospitalized. It’s more common in women than in men, and the benefits still outweigh the risks of vaccination, officials say. Nine million doses of the vaccine have been delivered in the U.S.

May 26: A 37-year old woman in Belgium died from a blood clot thought to be related to the Johnson and Johnson vaccine she received. The country has stopped using the vaccine in patients under the age of 41.


Astrazeneca

On September 6, the company paused the trial to investigate a patient who developed transverse myelitis – dangerous inflammation of the spinal cord. Researchers determined that the incident was unrelated to the vaccine and quickly restarted the trial in most countries, however it remained paused in the US until October 26. On October 21, scientists reported a patient in the trial had died, however, according to a local newspaper, the patient was in the control arm of the trial, meaning they’d received a placebo instead of the vaccine, so the trial is ongoing.

In earlier trials, many patients reported mild adverse effects similar to those associated with the other vaccines including injection site pain, rash, headaches, muscle soreness, and fevers. The team gave some of these patients preventative acetaminophen to reduce pain and fever. Nearly half of patients also experienced temporary neutropenia – a reduction in white blood cells that can make a person more susceptible to infections.

The vaccine has been approved for use in the U.K., Argentina, India, E.U. and Mexico.

March 11: Denmark has paused the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine while it investigates whether it is responsible for blood clots — one fatal — in some patients.

“It is important for us that the citizens are confident in the offer we give them and trust that we can vouch for the quality of the vaccines we have in our program. Therefore, we react promptly until we have investigated whether there is a connection between the vaccine and the possible side effects ,” officials wrote in a press release.

March 15: Several other countries (Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Ireland, the Netherlands, Italy, France and Germany) have also paused use of the vaccine while unusual clotting events are investigated. Meanwhile, Thailand, which paused its use on Friday, March 12 restarted it on Sunday, March 14. On Sunday, AstraZeneca released a statement that its own review revealed “no increased risk” of clotting issues with the vaccine and that “So far across the  EU and UK, there have been 15 events of DVT [deep vein thrombosis] and 22 events of pulmonary embolism reported among those given the vaccine, based on the number of cases the Company has received as of 8 March. This is much lower than would be expected to occur naturally in a general population of this size and is similar across other licensed COVID-19 vaccines.”

March 18: The European Medicines Agency (EMA) issued a statement that the benefits of the AstraZeneca vaccine outweigh the risks. The vaccine is not associated with an overall risk of blood clots, though there may be a very small increased risk of certain types of clots. The statement reads, “These are rare cases – around 20 million people in the UK and EEA had received the vaccine as of March 16 and EMA had reviewed only 7 cases of blood clots in multiple blood vessels (disseminated intravascular coagulation, DIC) and 18 cases of CVST [clots in the vessels that drain blood from the brain.] A causal link with the vaccine is not proven, but is possible and deserves further analysis.” These cases were more common in women under the age of 55. Germany, France, Italy, Latvia, Bulgaria and Slovenia have all stated that they’d restart or continue to offer the AstraZeneca vaccine in light of the news.

April 7: The EMA still says the benefits of the vaccines outweigh the risks. However, the group has suggested that blood clots be listed as a possible, albeit rare, side effect of the injection and that both patients and doctors be aware of the signs which include: shortness of breath, chest pain, leg swelling, persistent abdominal pain, neurological symptoms like blurry vision and blood spots under the skin beyond the site of injection. If you have these symptoms, seek medical assistance.


April 9: Out of 34 million recipients of the vaccine, 222 have reported blood clots. They appear to be more likely in younger patients, but it’s otherwise impossible to predict who will experience them. Some experts say they can be treated with intravenous immune globulin, which is currently used to treat immune disorders along with some types of blood thinners.

June 9: A study in Nature Medicine suggests that there may be a very slightly elevated risk of blood disorders after receipt of the AstraZeneca vaccine, but not Pfizer’s. The study was based on an analysis of medical records in Scotland. Researchers say the vaccine’s benefits still outweigh the risks and that their results should not alter policy. The rates are similar to those seen with other common vaccines.


Novavax (United Kingdom)

Novavax began Phase III clinical trials with its vaccine candidate in the United Kingdom in September and is had planned to start a trial in the United States in October. The trial was delayed due to manufacturing problems. The U.S. trial started on December 28. During Phase I/II trials, patients reported adverse events similar to those of other vaccine candidates, including injection site pain, rash, headaches, muscle pain, fever, nausea and vomiting. 


 Sinopharm (China) 

In July, Sinopharm launched Phase III trials of its two vaccine candidates in the United Arab Emirates, Peru, Morocco, and Argentina, which are now approved for limited use in healthcare workers in China and the UAE. In earlier trials of one of the vaccines, made in collaboration with Wuhan Institute of Biological Products, about 15% of the patients reported adverse events similar to those of other vaccine candidates, including injection site pain, rash, headaches, muscle pain, fever, nausea and vomiting. There is little data available about the second vaccine, made in collaboration with the Beijing Institute of Biological Products.


Sinovac (China)

Sinovac opened Phase III trials of its vaccine candidate, CoronaVac, in July. It is already being used with emergency approval for high risk individuals in China. The earlier trials showed that about a third of patients experienced adverse effects similar to those in other vaccine candidates like injection site pain, fever, and fatigue, but the study included few details about more specific symptoms like nausea, headaches, and vomiting. On November 10, the trial was halted in Brazil due to a participant’s death. However, researchers say the death was not vaccine-related and the trial should continue. It has not been halted in other countries.


Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (England)

The Murdoch Children’s Research Institute is running a Phase III trial repurposing Bacillus Calmette-Guerin — a vaccine developed nearly a century ago to prevent tuberculosis infections — to prevent Covid-19. Since the vaccine has been around such a long time, there are many reports on its potential adverse effects and the vaccine itself has been altered to minimize many of them. Injection site reactions are common, and lymphadenitis, swelling of the lymph nodes, is common.  

Bharat Biotech

Bharat Biotech announced it would begin Phase III trials in India on October 23. In early trials demonstrated side effect profiles similar to those of the other vaccines, including pain at the injection site, fatigue, headache, and fever. The country announced emergency approval, though no Phase III data was included in the announcement.

 


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Dave
Dave
8 hours ago

6/7/2021   2pm~ Pfizer 1st dose. CVS walk-in. Left arm. 145lbs. 5′ 8″. O type. RH+.   5 min after. Pulse felt in blood vessel once – upper arm few inches.   30min. Very slight decrease in muscle strength response lifting things into cart on left side.   Very mild upper arm soreness, comes and goes. Not always present.   7pm. Shower. Notice slightly off balance of not focusing. Much like moving around a few inches with eyes closed.   Hot water helps take it away for awhile.    8:30 pm slight off balance if not focusing. Tired, maybe from… Read more »

Pat
Pat
1 day ago

Completed pfizer vaccination March 1, 2021. Diagnosis: right bundle branch block (heart arrhythmia) June 1, 2021 via standard screening, my age 63 years.
I have 2 friends, post covid 19 vaccination, both started atrial fibrillation (heart arrhythmia), after covid vaccination ages: in 70’s.

Indigo Blue
Indigo Blue
1 day ago

I received the Pfizer vaccine in the last week of January. Two days later, I began to experience muscle cramps and twitching. The cramps subsided after about twelve weeks, however, the twitching persists and is worse after exercise.

Shelley Mork
Shelley Mork
2 days ago

I had vaccine in February and a month later my arm started to really hurt and has been painful to this day. Why would I still have such pain around and above injection site after all these months?

SPinNC
SPinNC
4 days ago

I received the 1st dose of Pfizer vaccine on May24. I had a little muscle pain at the site of the injection. Three days after shot it was gone. A few days later (maybe during the second week) came the heart palpitations. Seems like many have experienced this and have been checked out only to find that everything is ok. It’s a bit unnerving but drinking water, eating and resting seems to help. Hoping it will subside soon as it is somewhat unsettling. I am trying not to overreact but it does make you feel a little out of sorts… Read more »

Last edited 4 days ago by SPinNC
Carol
Carol
4 days ago

I received the Johnson and Johnson vaccine on March 15th and didn’t really notice any side effects other than a big red mark on my arm that took about 2 weeks to go away. Recently though I have had heart palpitations and don’t know if it is related to the vaccine as I have never had heart problems. I went to my doctor, they did a 24 hr. holter monitor and am diagnosed with pvc’s 20,000 in 24 hours. I was wondering if anyone else has experienced this after the vaccine, this all happened about a month after the vaccine,… Read more »

C G
C G
5 days ago

I am a healthy 29yo female and I went in for the first Moderna dose. I went to a pharmacy where they gave me the injection and I was instructed to wait in the lobby for 15 minutes. Within one minute of getting the shot and having a seat, I sent a text to my fiance saying I feel funny. I became lightheaded and my heart began to race rapidly and I began to sweat profusely. I began to fan myself with my vaccine paperwork and that’s when the pharmacist noticed I was having a negative reaction. I dropped to… Read more »

Cheryl Clayton-Molina
Cheryl Clayton-Molina
6 days ago

I had my 2nd Moderna shot on April 5th and today, June 7th my arm is killing me. I am taking Tylenols and was told it will get better. The pain wakes me up at night. I have been doing exercises and it is still painful. I am very concern even though the Covid nurse informed me when I called, that I should be fine and to continue taking ibuprofen and use hot and cold pads and to exercise my arm. Any suggestions?

Eileen Riccione
Eileen Riccione
8 days ago

I have the moderna On February 5th. I had no reaction at all but three days later my right foot was very swollen. Had a burning sensation as well couldn’t walk on it. Two rounds of steroids and inflammation went down. March 5th I received my second shot. Minimal reactions. Seems like I was in a fog and a little headache. Six days later I developed vertigo. I’ve never had vertigo in my life. The whole month I was dizzy and have had a severe headache. The headache has not gone away. It has changed my life. Hard to work,… Read more »

Christopher Cohen
Christopher Cohen
9 days ago

I was down for three days after my first shot with pain and fever but this is because I believe I already had covid so my first shot was like my second. I had lumps in my armpit the size of grapes for a full week. Two weeks after the Pfizer shot and my arm keeps going numb. I have pain radiating up my shoulder into my neck. There is no way I am getting my second shot.

David Miller
David Miller
10 days ago

Have a few friends whose blood sugar went crazy even up to 18 weeks after the 2nd shot. MY BP went high for about a week 16 weeks of so after. Been over 18 weeks for me now and still have off an on unspecified anxiety which may or not be related. Anyone similar?

Millers53
Millers53
10 days ago

Also in response to those who posted earlier, I did have heart palpitations Off and on for the first week after the vaccine and occasionally I still get them. Full heart work up in cardiologist said all was okay, heart rate can be elevated when everybody is mounting a large immune response. Hope this might help some of you were who are worried as I know I am – but trying to be reassured from David Miller’s reply that we will all get past these symptoms in time. (Glad you are well David!) Hoping the best for everyone. My husband… Read more »

Millers53
Millers53
10 days ago

Hi all, wanted to post an update. Had first Pfizer vaccine on April 24th. Had the worst fatigue anxiety and insomnia for two-plus weeks. One trip to ER where everything checked out okay but was told I had fatigue and should probably not take the second dose. I have not and will not. Week of 5/17 started feeling back to normal with mild anxiety and insomnia. On 5/21 noticed fatigue and anxiety increasing. On 5/28 diagnosed with facial and eye shingles. Luckily a mild case, but fatigue and anxiety are awful. Dr. Said he has seen many people getting shingles… Read more »

jada
jada
11 days ago

also after you get your shot take 2 tylenol to bring any fever down.

jada
jada
11 days ago

hi, my name is Jada i am 13, and got my first shot yesterday my arm is a little sore but I got my shot on my left arm and my thumb is itch and sore as if I got a bruise on my thumb it itches like crazy and so does my left foot also my fingertip of my thumb slightly burn on my thumb so what is this??

Mark B
Mark B
11 days ago

It’s been 2 weeks since Moderna vac and still have heart palpitations and screwed up blood sugar levels

William
William
13 days ago

Pfizer vaccine. 3:15 PM Pfizer Injection. Left upper arm. No problem. Sitting up, resting quietly in waiting room. 3:24. Left thoracic chest discomfort, slight sensitivity to light . No sensation of pain at injection site. 3:29. Slight bilateral temporal headache. TMJ ache. 3:36 Mild headache persists behind eyes. 3:40. Released. Heading to back to office 3:50. In office. Bilateral high pitched tinnitus in 32 dBA quiet room. L>R. 4 of 10 in loudness. Headache mild persists. 4:01 Left thoracic chest pain gone. 5:10 PM Diarrhea. Ears still ringing 5 of 10. Mild headache. Still sensitive to light. 7:31. Watching movie.… Read more »

Melissa S
Melissa S
15 days ago

I received Pfizer vaccine on 4/30/2021 and had a horrible reaction which started out as not being able to taste and my entire mouth felt like I had eaten or drank something scalding hot and my tongue because extremely swollen, red and very painful. My speech was impaired due to the swelling. It seemed like each day it was getting worse. Naturally I went to my physician and told him all of my symptoms and I had taken pictures of my tongue to document it. Nearly 30 days out and my tongue is still not at 100% a portion of… Read more »

mitch
mitch
15 days ago

Hi I am on my 6th day of my sinovac vaccine shot and I am diabetic Type 2 and AB+blood type. I have been tracking my symptoms and eversince I took the vaccine i have observed an erratic unsual health status in a daily basis. Day 1 got a covid vaccinated heavy arm at 8am, then headaches at 10am, pain or lump in my neck at 12 pm, then feeling heat ot hot flushes at 3pm and finally rashes went out at 10pm cant sleep lead me to insomia. Day 2 different story got less of these side effects. Day… Read more »

Last edited 15 days ago by mitch
Bill
Bill
15 days ago

I’m 9 days post 2nd Pfizer. Didn’t feel anything after first shot. 2nd shot put me on my ass for two days, flu like symptoms. No big deal. But then began trouble breathing day three, day four heart palpitations which have not stopped. I’m very healthy, workout, don’t drink or smoke and eat very healthy. The only difference in my were the Pfizer shots. Feel exhausted and palpitating won’t stop, out of breath just sitting sometimes. This is awful. Anyone else have similar and recover?

Holly
Holly
16 days ago

Has anyone had a Stevens -Johnson Syndrome reaction to any of the Vaccinations?

Barb Clark
Barb Clark
18 days ago

I had major back surgery in December. Back was starting to feel great by early Feb. Had 2nd Moderna vaccination on 3/3/21 and had the typical fever, body aches, fatigue. Nearly 3 months later, the back ache has not gone away. It is different than my back pain pre-surgery, it feels like the body aches from a fever. Ibuprofen hasn’t phased it.

Betty Weeks
Betty Weeks
18 days ago

I have reported my heart- burn symptoms since receiving my Pfzer vaccines, everyone needs to let them know so we can hopefully find out how to get rid of it. Please call Vaers at – 800-822-7967 or vaers.hss.gov or so at least they know this is another side effect

Barbara
Barbara
19 days ago

Hi, anyone experiencing Tinnitus and did it get better over time? I took the Astrazenea shot and have ringing in my ears. Id love to hear from anyone who experienced this symptom and feels it is slowly subsiding. I am nervous about taking the second shot.

Betty Weeks
Betty Weeks
19 days ago

I got my first Pfizer vaccine on April 13, 2021 and second shot on May4, 2021, soon after my first shot I have been getting Heart Burn , this is still going on, I didn’t think anything of this was related to the vaccine until today and have read on several sites people have been reporting it. I have been to my Doctor last week and have blood work done and a Breathe test done, haven’t heard the results about them yet. I have never had a heartburn issue until now, I do hope it goes away soon, and am… Read more »

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