How ‘Medical’ Is Marijuana?

Quick Hits: Transvaginal Mesh Pulled, New Weight Loss Drug & More

A systematic review published in The Journal of the American Medical Association looked at all randomized controlled trials of cannabis or cannabinoids to treat medical conditions. They found 79 trials involving more than 6,400 participants. Medical marijuana prevented nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy (47% of those using it versus 20% of controls). However, the combined trials did not show that it helps with psychosis, glaucoma, depression, dementia, epilepsy, Tourette’s syndrome or schizophrenia. Via The New York Times. Posted July 20, 2015.

–Alanna McCatty


Alanna McCatty

Alanna McCatty

Alanna McCatty is founder and CEO of McCatty Scholars, an organization that devises and implements financial literacy programs for students to combat the nationwide issue of the loss of educational opportunity due to the ramifications of burdensome student debt. At MedShadow, she reports on new findings and research on the side effects of prescription drugs. She is a graduate of Pace University.


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