Medical Marijuana Has ‘Limited’ Effectiveness in Multiple Sclerosis

Drugs containing compounds found in marijuana may have a modest benefit in treating the symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Researchers analyzed 17 clinical trials involving more than 3,100 patients with MS to determine the safety and effectiveness of cannabinoids, chemical compounds found in marijuana. Use of medications containing cannabinoids led to “limited and mild reduction” in contracted muscles, pain and bladder dysfunction in patients, according to results published in JAMA Network Open.

The analysis also found that there were few serious side effects. Some side effects patients did report, however, included memory problems, dizziness, dry mouth, fatigue, drowsiness and poor balance. And the rate of side effects was higher in those that took a marijuana product compared to placebo.

The trials examined in the meta-analysis did not involve smoked marijuana. The versions used in the trials were administered orally (such as Namisol) or nasally (such as Sativex) cannabis extract, or Marinol (dronabinol) and Cesamet (nabilone). The latter two are drugs that are synthetic versions of THC, a cannabinoid, and are used to prevent nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy.

Researchers also noted that most of the studies examined were conducted by the manufacturers of the cannabinoid drugs. A new cannabinoid-based medication, Epidiolex, will become available later this year in the US for the treatment of seizures associated with two types of epilepsy. The liquid contains extracts of the cannabinoid cannabidiol.


Jonathan Block

Jonathan Block

Jonathan Block is an associate editor at BioCentury, which provides news and information about the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Prior to joining BioCentury in 2019, Jonathan worked for MedShadow as content editor. He has been an editor and writer for multiple pharmaceutical, health and medical publications, including The Pink Sheet, Modern Healthcare, Health Plan Week and Psychiatry Advisor. He holds a BA from Tufts University and is earning an MPH with a focus on health policy from the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy.


Did you find this article helpful?


Latest News

Vitamin E, the Source of Mystery Vaping Illness

Vitamin E, the Source of Mystery Vaping Illness

A “breakthrough” in the investigation of vaping illness and death, EVALI, has been announced by Federal health officials and the CDC (Centers for Disease Control).

Heart and Thyroid Drugs, Juul

Heart and Thyroid Drugs, Juul

Some heart drugs can cause suicide risks, Juul shipped a million contaminated pods and hormone replacement therapy during pregnancy doesn’t cause language delays in the children.

  • Advertisement