Quick Hits: Older Adults Want To Take Fewer Drugs, Talk Therapy Side Effects & More

Quick Hits: Transvaginal Mesh Pulled, New Weight Loss Drug & More

Two out of three older adults would like to decrease the number of medications they are taking, according to a new survey. Also, nine out of 10 of them would stop taking one or more medicines if their doctor told them it was okay. Researchers based their findings on results from the National Health and Aging Trends Study, which includes adults 65 and older. Almost 50% of seniors take five or more medications. Taking many medications simultaneously, commonly known as polypharmacy, can lead to an increased risk of side effects and drug interactions. The survey also showed that those with chronic medical conditions were more likely to want to cut back on the number of drugs they take. The researchers said the results indicate that doctors should be comfortable bringing up the idea of deprescribing with senior patients. Posted October 15, 2018. Via JAMA Internal Medicine.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), one of the most popular treatments for various kinds of mental illnesses, is not without unwanted effects, according to a new study. These unwanted effects include distress, strains in relations with family, feelings of guilt and shame and intense emotions. Researchers interviewed 100 therapists and asked them to think about a client they had seen for at least 10 sessions. The therapists were then asked if the client had experienced any of 17 unwanted effects from therapy. Based on the interviews, researchers say about 40% of those undergoing CBT experience at least one unwanted event. They added that the unwanted effects may be an inevitable part of dealing with difficult thoughts and events. Posted October 7, 2018. Via Cognitive Therapy and Research.

Drugmakers would be required to disclose the price of a medication in television drug ads under a new proposal from the Trump administration. The proposed rule would mandate that the ad mention the wholesale or list price for a typical course of treatment, or a 30-day supply if the drug is a long-term medication. This is the price of a drug before insurance coverage picks up at least part of the cost. The administration is pushing the requirement as part of an effort to increase price transparency of drugs. Medications with a list price of less than $35 per month would be exempt from the price disclosure requirement. The top 10 most advertised drugs on television have list prices ranging from $535 to $11,000 per month, according to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Posted October 15, 2018. Via Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.


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