Quick Hits: More Fluoroquinolone Risks

Quick Hits: Transvaginal Mesh Pulled, New Weight Loss Drug & More

Taking fluoroquinolone antibiotics can increase one’s risk of developing an enlargement of and potential tears in the aorta, the heart’s main artery. New research has found that taking drugs such as Cipro (ciprofloxacin) or Levaquin (levofloxacin) is associated with an increased risk for aortic aneurysm and dissection, and that risk increases the longer a person takes the medication. The two conditions are normally slow to develop, but researchers noted fluoroquinolones may speed up that process. Researchers analyzed records of around 1,200 patients that were hospitalized for aortic aneurysm and dissection and compared them to 1,200 control subjects. An editorial accompanying the study said that doctors should be careful in prescribing fluoroquinolones in those that have risk factors for aortic aneurysm, such as older age, smoking and hypertension. Posted September 12, 2018. Via American College of Cardiology.

 


Jonathan Block

Jonathan Block

Jonathan Block is a freelance writer and former MedShadow content editor. He has been an editor and writer for multiple pharmaceutical, health and medical publications, including BioCentury, The Pink Sheet, Modern Healthcare, Health Plan Week and Psychiatry Advisor. He holds a BA from Tufts University and is earning an MPH with a focus on health policy from the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy.


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